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Zi Tang Weight Loss - Chinese Yams

Zi Tang Weight Loss - Chinese Yams

Zi Tang Weight LossZi Tang Weight Loss1509 Harvard StreetHamilton, OH 45015ph: 513-444-8077alt: 513-668-1562shawn_melissa@zitangweightloss.comHome Product InformationBarbary Wolf Berry Fruit Bee Pollen Chinese Yams Lotus Seed Dietary Fiber How Zi Xiu Tang Works Counterfeit InformationCounterfiet Zi Xiu Tang Websites Consumer Health Disclaimer FAQ Daily Inspiration Easy Checkout Contact Us Chinese YamsTraditionally, wild yam was used to help with coughs, morning sickness, digestive upset and nerve pain. Now, they also help   Menopause    High cholesterol    High triglycerides    Muscle tension and pain    Premenstrual syndrome    Abdominal crampsYams are a good source of potassium, a mineral that helps to control blood pressure. Since many people not only do not eat enough fruits and vegetables, but also consume high amounts of sodium, as salt is frequently added to processed foods, they may be deficient in potassium. Low intake of potassium-rich foods, especially when coupled with a high intake of sodium, can lead to hypertension.  Protection against Cardiovascular DiseaseYams are a good source of Vitamin B6. Vitamin B6 is needed by the body to break down a substance called homo-cysteine, which can directly damage blood vessel walls. Individuals who suffer a heart attack despite having normal or even low cholesterol levels are often found to have high levels of homo-cysteine. Since high homo-cysteine levels are significantly associated with increased risk of heart attack and stroke, having a good supply of vitamin B6 on hand makes a great deal of sense. High intakes of vitamin B6 have also been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease. Yams and PotassiumYams are a good source of potassium, a mineral that helps to control blood pressure. Since many people not only do not eat enough fruits and vegetables, but also consume high amounts of sodium as salt is frequently added to processed foods, they may be deficient in potassium. Low intake of potassium-rich foods, especially when coupled with a high intake of sodium, can lead to hypertension. In the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) study, one group ate servings of fruits and vegetables in place of snacks and sweets, and also ate low-fat dairy food. This diet delivered more potassium, magnesium and calcium. Another group ate a "usual" diet low in fruits and vegetables with a fat content like that found in the average American Diet. After eight weeks, the group that ate the enhanced diet lowered their blood pressure by an average of 5.5 points (systolic) over 3.0 points (diastolic). Dioscorin, a storage protein contained in yam, may also be of benefit to certain individuals with hypertension. Preliminary research suggests that dioscorin can inhibit angiotensin converting enzyme, which would therefore lead to increased kidney blood flow and reduced blood pressure. A Look at Yam, Diogenes, and Menopausal SymptomsMany consumers have found products in the marketplace that promote wild yam or wild yam extracts as substances that can help provide a natural alternative to hormonal replacement in women who have reached the age of menopause. Many of these products are provided in the form of creams that can be topically applied. Even though the food itself is not usually promoted by natural products companies, these yam-containing products have sparked interest in the relationship between yam and menopause. Yams do contain some unique substances called steroidal saponins, and among these substances are chemicals called Diogenes. Because of similarities between Diogenes and progesterone, questions were initially raised about the ability of our body to convert Diogenes into progesterone, but research has shown that the answer here is clearly no. Diogenes does, however, have an impact on hormonal patterns in studies involving animals, and may be helpful in lowering risk of osteoporosis, although we don''t as yet have any human studies in this area. Yams in Herbal MedicinesWild yam also has some history of traditional use in herbal medicine, especially Chinese herbal medicine, as a botanical that can affect organ system function. While the focus here has been on kidney function, wild yam (or Chinese yam) has also been used to support the female endocrine system. For example, there has been traditional use of this root in conjunction with lactation. We''ve only seen one high-quality, peer-reviewed research study in which women were actually given wild yam (in the form of a topical cream) to determine the impact of this plant on menopausal symptoms. Although this research showed some very limited benefits from the wild yam cream-and no side effects-none of the symptom changes were statistically significant. In summary, we''d say that there''s no research evidence to support the claim that yam has special benefits when it comes to menopause, but that more research is needed in this area because there is a clear connection between yam, Diogenes, and endocrine function that is not yet understood. Yams and B6We''d also like to add some information about yam and vitamin B6. Vitamin B6 has been an especially popular supplement with respect to premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in women, especially in conjunction with the depression that can be triggered by PMS. Some companies have also advocated the use of this vitamin for menopausal symptoms. One cup of baked cubed yam contains 15.5% of the Daily Value for B6, and we rank yam as a "good" source of vitamin B6 for this reason. In research studies, however, the dose of vitamin B6 required for help with PMS depression is about 50-100 milligrams-many, many times the Daily Value level of 2.0 milligrams. So if you''re a woman, even though yam might be a food well-worth including in your meal plan in conjunction with PMS, the amount of vitamin B6 that you''d be getting from this food would be insufficient (by itself) to reach the therapeutic level shown to be helpful in research studies.  Blood Sugar and Weight ControlYams'' complex carbohydrates and fiber deliver the goods gradually, slowing the rate at which their sugars are released and absorbed into the bloodstream. In addition, because they''re rich in fiber, yams fill you up without filling out your hips and waistline. And one more benefit, yams are a good source of manganese, a trace mineral that helps with carbohydrate metabolism and is a co-factor in a number of enzymes important in energy production and antioxidant defenses. You''ve just got to hand it to Mother Nature; when she brings forth a food, she makes sure it integrates everything needed to contribute to your health and vitality. HistoryAlthough it is uncertain from which country yams originated, yams are one of the oldest food plants known. They have been cultivated since 50,000 BC in Africa and Asia. In addition to these continents, yams also currently grow in the tropical and subtropical regions of North and South America. Yams are one of the most popular and widely consumed foods in the world. They play a staple role in the diets of many different countries, notably those in South America, Africa, the Pacific Islands, and the West Indies.  The Chinese yam (Dioscorea opposita) has long been used as a traditional medicine and food stuff in China, to relieve stomach pain and diarrhea. Now modern science is revealing that yams have even greater health benefits. Shujun Wang, at Tianjin University, and co-workers have discovered that the starch in yams helps to reduce hyperlipidemia — high levels of fatty lipid molecules in the bloodstream — which is a major cause of death throughout the world.Previous research has established that diet is important in the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis. Therefore, as well as investigating the physicochemical properties of Chinese yam and potato starches, the researchers also studied the effects of the yam starch on the blood lipid levels in hyperlipidemia rats and compared them with the effects of potato and cereal starches.They found that the rats that were fed yam starch had significantly decreased levels of cholesterol and triglyceride fats in their blood, but those that were fed potato starch showed a change that was not statistically significant. The researchers believe that yam starch is more resistant than potato starch — it escapes digestion in the small intestine and passes through to the large intestine.This newly discovered role for starch also implies that uncooked yams with intact starch granules  are better than cooked yams for lowering blood lipids. In future, the researchers hope to uncover the enzyme and gene mechanisms that work to cause this lipid reduction.          Copyright 2011 Zi Tang Weight Loss. All rights reserved. Web Hosting by Yahoo!Zi Tang Weight Loss1509 Harvard StreetHamilton, OH 45015ph: 513-444-8077alt: 513-668-1562shawn_melissa@zitangweightloss.com